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Ketanji Brown Jackson Net Worth, Biography, Career, Age, Family, Ideology

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Ketanji Brown Jackson

Who is Ketanji Brown Jackson?

Full nameKetanji Brown Jackson
Date of birthSeptember 14, 1970
Occupation attorney
NationalityAmerican
SpousePatrick Jackson
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Ketanji Brown Jackson Biography

Ketanji Brown Jackson was born on September 14, 1970, in Washington, D.C. Her parents were both graduates of historically Black colleges and universities. Her father, Johnny Brown, ultimately became the chief attorney for the Miami-Dade County School Board; her mother, Ellery, served as school principal at New World School of the Arts.

 Jackson grew up in Miami, Florida, and graduated from Miami Palmetto Senior High School in 1988.

After high school, Jackson studied government at Harvard University, graduating in 1992 with an A.B. magna cum laude. When she was in college, her uncle was sentenced to life in prison due to a nonviolent cocaine conviction.

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Years later, Jackson persuaded a law firm to take his case pro bono, and President Barack Obama eventually commuted his sentence.

Another uncle, Calvin Ross, served as Miami’s police chief. During her time at Harvard, Jackson led protests against a student who displayed a Confederate flag from his dorm window. She also performed improv comedy and took classes in drama.

Ketanji Brown Jackson Career

Jackson worked as a staff reporter and researcher for Time magazine from 1992 to 1993, then attended Harvard Law School, where she was a supervising editor of the Harvard Law Review. She graduated in 1996 with a Juris Doctor cum laude.

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After law school, Jackson served as a law clerk to Judge Patti B. Saris of the U.S. District Court for the District of Massachusetts from 1996 to 1997, then to Judge Bruce M.

Selya of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit from 1997 to 1998. She spent a year in private practice at the Washington, D.C. law firm Miller Cassidy Larroca & Lewin (now part of Baker Botts), then clerked for Justice Stephen Breyer of the U.S. Supreme Court from 1999 to 2000.

Jackson worked in private legal practice from 2000 to 2003. From 2003 to 2005, she served as an assistant special counsel to the United States Sentencing Commission.

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From 2005 to 2007, Jackson was an assistant federal public defender in Washington, D.C., where she handled cases before U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.

 A Washington Post review of cases Jackson handled during her time as a public defender showed that “she won uncommon victories against the government that shortened or erased lengthy prison terms”.

From 2007 to 2010, Jackson was an appellate specialist at Morrison & Foerster.

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on 25th Febuary, 2022, President Joe Biden announced Friday that he will nominate Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, to succeed Justice Stephen Breyer on the Supreme Court.

U.S. Sentencing Commission

On July 23, 2009, Barack Obama nominated Jackson to become vice chair of the United States Sentencing Commission. The U.S. Senate confirmed Jackson by unanimous consent on February 11, 2010. She succeeded Michael E. Horowitz, who had served from 2003 until 2009.

On September 20, 2012, Obama nominated Jackson to serve as a judge for the United States district court for the District of Columbia to the seat vacated by retiring Judge Henry H. Kennedy Jr.

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Ketanji Brown Jackson family

In 1996, Jackson married surgeon Patrick G. Jackson, MD, a sixth-generation Harvard graduate. The couple have two daughters. Patrick Jackson’s twin brother is the brother-in-law of Janna Ryan, wife of former Speaker of the House Paul Ryan.

Ketanji Brown Jackson Ideology

In January 2022, The New York Times reported that Jackson had “not yet written a body of appeals court opinions expressing a legal philosophy,” because she had joined the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit in the summer of 2021. However, they said, Jackson’s earlier rulings “comported with those of a liberal-leaning judge,” including her opinions blocking various Trump administration actions.

According to Sahil Kapur, writing for NBC News, “Jackson fits well with the Democratic Party and the progressive movement’s agenda” due to her relative youth, background as a public defender, and history of labor-friendly rulings.

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Source: Glusea

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